password security

Coverage In Action: Cyber Liability

As technology becomes increasingly important for successful business operations, the value of a strong cyber liability insurance policy continues to grow. The continued rise in the amount of information stored and transferred electronically has resulted in a remarkable increase in the potential exposures facing businesses.

In an age where a stolen laptop or data breach can instantly compromise the personal data of thousands of customers, protecting your business from cyber liability is just as important as some of the more traditional exposures businesses account for in their commercial general liability policies.

Claims Scenario: Outsourcing Gone Wrong

The company: A national construction company that outsources some of its cyber security protections

The challenge: A construction firm partnered with a third-party cloud service provider in order to store customer information. While this service helped the company save on server costs, the third-party firm suffered a data breach.

As a result, the construction firm had to notify 10,000 of its customers and was forced to pay nearly $200,000 in incident investigation costs. The incident was made worse by the fact that the firm did not have a document retention procedure, which complicated the incident response process.

Cyber liability insurance in action: Following a data breach or other cyber event, the right policy can help organizations recoup a number of key costs. Specifically, cyber liability policies often cover investigation and forensics expenses—expenses that can easily bankrupt smaller firms who forgo coverage.

What’s more, when third parties are involved, managing litigation concerns can be a challenge. By using cyber liability insurance, organizations have access to legal professionals well-versed in cyber lawsuits and response.

Benefits of Cyber Liability Insurance

  • Data breach coverage—In the event of a breach, organizations are required by law to notify affected parties. This can add to overall data breach costs, particularly as they relate to security fixes, identity theft protection for those impacted by the breach and protection from possible legal action. Cyber liability policies include coverage for these exposures, thus safeguarding your data from cyber criminals.
  • Business interruption loss reimbursement—A cyber attack can lead to an IT failure that disrupts business operations, costing your organization both time and money. Cyber liability policies may cover your loss of income during these interruptions. What’s more, increased costs to your business operations in the aftermath of a cyber attack may also be covered.
  • Cyber extortion defence—Ransomware and similar malicious software are designed to steal and withhold key data from organizations until a steep fee is paid. As these types of attacks increase in frequency and severity, it’s critical that organizations seek cyber liability insurance, which can help recoup losses related to cyber extortion.
  • Legal support—In the wake of a cyber incident, businesses often seek legal assistance. This assistance can be costly. Cyber liability insurance can help businesses afford proper legal work following a cyber attack.

Contact Tooher-Ferraris Insurance Group today to learn more about your unique exposures and options for Cyber Liability Coverage. Using our industry specific cyber exposure scorecards we can customize a plan for your unique needs.

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Precautions for Better Cyber Security

Business operations in the technology industry revolve around the functionality of computers, network connections and the Internet. It’s no secret that computer use comes with many risks, including damaging viruses, hackers, the illegal use of your system to attack others, the use of sensitive data to steal identities and other illegal actions. As a result, companies must respond by preventing, detecting and responding to cyber attacks through a well-orchestrated cyber security program.

Get Familiar with Risks

The first step in protecting your business is to take notice of the multitude of cyber risks:

Hackers, attackers and intruders: These people seek to exploit weaknesses in software and computer systems for their personal gain. Although their intentions are sometimes benign, their actions are typically in violation of the intended use of the systems that they are exploiting. The results of this cyber risk can range from minimal mischief (creating a virus with no negative impact) to malicious activity (stealing or altering data).

Malicious code (viruses, worms and Trojan horses):

  • Viruses: This malicious code requires a user to take action to let a virus into the system, such as opening an email attachment, downloading a file or visiting a webpage.
  • Worms: Once released, this code reproduces and spreads through systems on its own. They usually start by exploiting a software flaw; then, once the victim’s computer is infected, the worm will attempt to find and infect other computers through a network.
  • Trojan horses: This disguised code claims to do one thing while actually doing something else. For example, a program that claims to speed up your computer system but is actually sending confidential information to a remote intruder.

Risk Management Planning

To reduce your cyber risks, it is wise to develop an IT risk management plan at your organization. Risk management solutions utilize industry standards and best practices to assess hazards from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification or destruction of your organization’s information systems. Consider the following when implementing risk management strategies at your organization:

  • Create a formal, documented risk management plan that addresses the scope, roles, responsibilities, compliance criteria and methodology for performing cyber risk assessments. This plan should include a characterization of all systems used at the organization based on their function, the data stored and processed, and importance to the organization.
  • Review the cyber risk plan on an annual basis and update it whenever there are significant changes to your information systems, the facilities where systems are stored or other conditions that may affect the impact of risk to the organization. 

In addition, your organization should take precautionary measures when selecting your internet service provider (ISP) for use for company business.

ISP Considerations

Almost all ISPs offer Web browsing capabilities with a varying degree of user support and Web hosting capabilities. Your company should determine what ISP to use, along with a plan for backing up emails and files and what firewalls to implement.

To select an ISP that will reduce your cyber risks, consider the following:

  • Security: How concerned with security is the ISP? Does it use encryption and secure sockets layer (SSL) to protect any information that you submit?
  • Privacy: Does the ISP have a published privacy policy? Are you comfortable with who has access to your information, and how it is handled and used?
  • Services: Does your ISP offer the services that you want and do they meet your organization’s needs? Is there adequate support for the services provided?
  • Cost: Are the ISP’s costs affordable and are they reasonable for the number of services that you receive? Are you sacrificing quality and security to get a lower price?

Reliability: Are the services provided by the ISP reliable, or are they frequently unavailable due to maintenance, security problems and a high volume of users? If the ISP knows that their services will be unavailable, does it adequately communicate that information to its customers?

User support: Are there any published methods for contacting customer service, and do you receive prompt and friendly service? Do their hours of availability accommodate your company’s needs?

Speed: How fast is your ISP’s connection, and is it sufficient for your business needs?

Recommendations: What have you heard from industry peers about the ISP? Were they trusted sources? Does the ISP serve your geographic area?

Cybersecurity is a serious concern for your business. Contact Tooher Ferraris Insurance Group to learn about our risk management resources and insurance solutions for emerging technology exposures.

Mobile Device Security

Because of all they can offer, smartphones and tablet devices are essential to many professions’ daily operations. However, as use rises, it will become more and more important to ensure that security for these mobile devices is able to adequately protect you from new and existing threats.

The need for proper phone security is no different than the need for a well-protected computer network. Gone are the days when the most sensitive information on an employee’s phone is contact names and numbers. Now a smartphone could grant access to any number of applications, emails and stored passwords. Depending on how your organization uses such devices, unauthorized access to the information on a smartphone or tablet could be just as damaging as a data breach involving a more traditional computer system.

Lost or Stolen Devices

Because of their size and nature of use, mobile devices are at an increased risk of being lost or stolen. Since most devices automatically store passwords in their memory to keep users logged in to email and other applications, having physical possession of the device is one of the easiest ways for unauthorized users to access private information.

To prevent someone from accessing a lost or stolen device, the phone or tablet should be locked with a password. The password should be time sensitive, automatically locking the phone out after a short period of inactivity. Most devices come with such security features built in, which is something you should consider before purchasing. Depending on your cellphone provider, there are also services that allow you to remotely lockdown or erase a device in the event that it is lost or stolen.

Malicious Attacks

Mobile devices have the potential to be just as susceptible to malware and viruses as computers, yet many businesses don’t consider instituting the same type of safeguards. As reliance on these devices continues to grow, so will their attractiveness as potential targets. Third-party applications are especially threatening as a way for malware to install itself onto a device. Employees should never install unauthorized applications to their company devices.

Analyze Threats

Like any potential exposure, the level of risk brought on by mobile devices is based largely on how your company uses them. Conduct a formal risk assessment to see where your biggest risks are. Also establish when to conduct follow-up assessments to account for new exposures created by the ever-advancing state of technology.

Establish a Smartphone Policy

Before issuing smartphones to your employees, establish a device usage policy. Outline what does and does not constitute acceptable use and what actions will be taken if employees violate the policy. It is important that employees understand the security risk inherent to smartphone use and their role in its mitigation. Well informed, responsible users act as an invaluable layer of security protecting mobile devices.